Central Bank Digital Currency (CBDC)

CBDC Screenshot

Overview

A central bank digital currency (CBDC) is a digital currency issued by a central bank. In contrast to crypto assets and stablecoin projects like Diem, CBDCs are issued by the public sector. Therefore, CBDCs have a lower degree of risk than other types of digital money issued by the private sector. CBDCs can be divided into two categories: wholesale and retail CBDC. A wholesale CBDC is only available to banks and is similar to the existing digital central bank reserves. A retail CBDC grants end-users access to digital central bank money and can be used as an additional means of payment besides cash and commercial bank money.

germany-31017_640     See German publications below. 

Eurosystem report on the public consultation on a digital euro

ECB/Eurosystem Report

On 2 October 2020 the Eurosystem published its “Report on a digital euro”. The report formed the basis for seeking wider views on the benefits and challenges of issuing a digital euro and on its possible design. The report was followed by the “Public consultation on a digital euro”, which was
launched on 12 October 2020 and ran until 12 January 2021. The consultation included 18 questions aimed at collecting the views of both citizens and professionals. The first part was aimed mainly at citizens in their role as users, while the second targeted primarily financial, payment and technology professionals with specific knowledge of the economics, regulation and technology of (retail) payments.

Read more.

An IMF economist explains central bank digital currency to his mother

IMF Article / Basics

If you are looking for a good introduction to CBDCs, look no further. In this article on the basics of functionality and use of CBDCs, Tommaso Mancini-Griffoli explains the foundation of the new technology in a way not tech-savvy people understand too. 

Read more.

Synthetic central bank digital currency (sCBDC) — Public private CBDC collaboration

Medium

Central bank digital currencies (CBDCs) more and more approach reality. One special form of a CBDC is a synthetic CBDC (sCBDC). In such a setup, the CBDC system is not directly managed by the central bank, but a wide range of tasks is outsourced to private companies, such as e-money institutes. In the case of such a private public partnership, financial institutions fully back e-money with riskless central bank money. This results in a synthetic CBDC, a digital form of (e-)money that is fully backed by riskless central bank money. In this article, we explain and discuss such an sCBDC system in the context of the Euro area and compare it to a “classical” CBDC system.

Read more. 

Report on a digital Euro

ECB Paper

This report examines the issuance of a central bank digital currency (CBDC) – the digital Euro – from the perspective of the Eurosystem. Such a digital euro would be a central bank liability offered in digital form for use by citizens and businesses for their retail payments. It would complement the current offering of cash and wholesale central bank deposits.
The possible advantages of a digital euro and the rapid changes in the retail payment landscape imply that the Eurosystem needs to be equipped to issue it in the future. A digital euro could support the Eurosystem’s objectives by providing citizens with access to a safe form of money in the fast-changing digital world. This would support Europe’s drive towards continued innovation. It would also contribute to its strategic autonomy by providing an alternative to foreign payment providers for fast and efficient payments in Europe and beyond. 

Read more.

The Digital Euro and the Role of DLT for Central Bank Digital Currencies

Medium

Digitization has reached the monetary system. The advent of crypto assets, such as Bitcoin and Ether, revealed numerous advantages these digital assets based on distributed ledger technologies (DLTs) can bring: Using DLT can enhance the security of sensitive financial transaction data, increase transaction speed through faster processing and settlement and automate numerous business processes through smart contracts. These advantages ought to be realized in the conventional monetary system as well — not only in the “crypto industry”. DLT can be used both to digitally represent bank deposits and to tokenize central bank money via central bank digital currencies (CBDCs). Current DLT-based CBDC projects and prototypes among others by the Chinese and Swedish central banks, but also initiatives by the European Central Bank (ECB), show that DLT will be an essential pillar ofthe digitization of the monetary system in particular and the financial system in general in the future.

Read more.

How Will Blockchain Technology Transform the Current Monetary System?

Medium

Why should the payment systems we use and the money that is transferred via these systems itself make use of distributed ledger technology (DLT), namely Blockchain technology, the underlying technology of cryptocurrencies such as Bitcoin? This article gives a brief explanation of the structure of the current money and payment system and the functioning of blockchain technology with Bitcoin as an example. It further elaborates the advantages of DLT and its difference to the current design of the monetary system. The last chapter summarizes the different ways of how DLT can be used in our current money and payment system.

Read more.

The Digital, Programmable Euro: Statement by the FinTech Council of the German Federal Ministry of Finance

Medium

On July 23, 2020, the FinTech Council of the German Federal Ministry of Finance (German: FinTechRat des Bundesministerium der Finanzen) published a statement about the digital, programmable Euro. With this article, we provide an unofficial translation of the German version of the paper with the goal to make the content also available to non-German speaking readers. More information can be found on the website of the German Federal Ministry of Finance.

Read more.

Current CBDC Projects

According to a study by the Bank for International Settlements (BIS), 80% of worldwide central banks are researching or working on introducing a CBDC. Nevertheless, to date, no retail CBDC has been introduced yet. However, 10% of the surveyed central banks are likely to introduce a retail CBDC in the short-run (up to three years) and 20% in the medium-term (up to six years). The following section discusses current CBDC pioneers that are likely to introduce a CBDC soon.

CBDC pioneers: Which countries are currently testing a retail central bank digital currency?

Medium

Central bank digital currencies (CBDC) are currently a hot topic. A study by the Bank for International Settlements (BIS) from January 2020 shows that 80% of worldwide central banks are engaged in CBDC-related research (Boar et al. 2020, p. 3). The percentage of central banks that run experiments or proofs-of-concept is also growing, reaching almost 50%. 10% of the surveyed central banks plan to introduce a generally available (retail) CBDC in the next three years and 20% in the next six years (ibid., p. 7). Therefore, CBDC efforts are very dynamic and are expected to even increase in momentum within the next few years.

Read more.

A digital currency against climate change: The way of the Marshall Islands

Medium

Central bank digital currencies (CBDC) are on the rise. More and more CBDC projects are now reaching the test stage and are approaching the actual issuance of the digital currency. In addition to China, this also includes the Pacific island nation of the Marshall Islands. But what distinguishes this project from other CBDC initiatives? With the help of an own CBDC, the Marshall Islands aims to combat the consequences of climate change.

Read more.

China’s digital currency project: What is DC/EP all about?

Medium

Central bank digital currencies (CBDC) are becoming reality. On 16 April 2020, the Chinese central bank has started the test phase of its CBDC, called Digital Currency / Electronic Payment (DC/EP). It is currently tested in four Chinese cities: Shenzhen, Suzhou, Chengdu, and Xiong’an. China might be the first industrial economy worldwide to introduce a CBDC. This article outlines the current status of the DC/EP project and its economic and social implications.

Read more.


Überblick

Eine digitale Zentralbankwährung (engl: Central Bank Digital Currency, CBDC) bezeichnet von der Zentralbank emittiertes digitales Geld. Im Gegensatz zu Kryptowerten oder Stablecoin-Projekten wie Diem, werden CBDCs vom öffentlichen Sektor emittiert. Aus diesem Grund weisen CBDCs ein deutlich geringeres Risiko auf als andere, vom privaten Sektor emittierte digitale Geldarten. CBDCs können grob in zwei Kategorien unterteilt werden: Wholesale und Retail CBDCs. Wholesale CBDCs stehen nur Banken zur Verfügung und ähneln damit den bereits existierenden digitalen Zentralbankreserven. Retail CBDCs würden auch Endnutzern den Zugang zu digitalem Zentralbankgeld ermöglichen.

Der digitale Blockchain-Euro: Sind Central Bank Digital Currencies die Zukunft?

ifo Schnelldienst

Die fortschreitende Digitalisierung hat nun auch das Geldsystem erreicht. Das Aufkommen von Kryptowerten hat zahlreiche Vorteile aufgezeigt, die »Digital Assets«, die mit Distributed-Ledger-Technologien (DLT) verwaltet werden, mit sich bringen: DieNutzung von DLT kann die Sicherheit von sensiblen Finanztransaktionen erhöhen, die Transaktionsgeschwindigkeit durch schnellere Abwicklung steigern und durch Smart Contracts zahlreiche Geschäftsprozesse automatisieren. Diese Vorteile sollen nun auch in das konventionelle Geldsystem übertragen werden und nicht nur in der Szene der »Kryptowährungen« Anwendung finden.
DLT kann sowohl dafür genutzt werden, Giralgeld der Banken digital abzubilden, als auch Zentralbankgeld über digitale Zentralbankwährungen (Central Bank Digital Currencies – CBDCs) zu tokenisieren. Die aktuellen DLT-basierten CBDC-Projekte und
Prototypen der chinesischen und schwedischen Zentralbank, aber auch der EZB zeigen, dass DLT für die Digitalisierung des Geldsystems im Speziellen und des Finanzsystems im Allgemeinen zukünftig eine wichtige Säule darstellen wird.

Weiterlesen.

Stel­lung­nah­me: Der di­gi­ta­le, pro­gram­mier­ba­re Eu­ro

Artikel

Der FinTechRat hat sich in einem Positionspapier umfassend mit zukünftigen digitalen und insbesondere programmierbaren Geldformen befasst. Die Programmierbarkeit von Zahlungsflüssen könnte demnach zu einer Erhöhung der Effizienz im Zahlungsverkehr führen und einen maßgeblichen Innovationsschub bei der Digitalisierung der Industrie leisten.

Weiterlesen.

Aktuelle CBDC Projekte

Gemäß einer Studie der Bank für Internationalen Zahlungsausgleich (BIZ) forschen bereits 80% der weltweiten Zentralbanken an der Einführung eines CBDC oder arbeiten daran. Bis heute wurde jedoch noch keine retail CBDC eingeführt. Es ist jedoch wahrscheinlich, dass 10% der befragten Zentralbanken kurzfristig (bis zu drei Jahre) und 20% mittelfristig (bis zu sechs Jahre) eine CBDC für das Privatkundengeschäft einführen werden. Im folgenden Abschnitt werden die derzeitigen CBDC-Pioniere erörtert, die mit hoher Wahrscheinlichkeit bald eine CBDC einführen werden.

Digital Dollar Project: Die (R)Evolution des globalen Geld- und Finanzsystems

Artikel

In den USA nimmt die Diskussion über eine eigene digitale Währung immer mehr Fahrt auf. Mit dem Digital Dollar Project wurde zuletzt eine privatwirtschaftliche Initiative gestartet, die es sich zum Ziel gesetzt hat, eine digitale Zentralbankwährung (CBDC) zu etablieren. Beim digitalen US-Dollar soll es sich um eine token-basierte CBDC handeln, die von der amerikanischen Zentralbank ausgegeben wird und bestenfalls auf einer Distributed-Ledger-Technologie (DLT) abgebildet wird. Jonas Groß und Alexander Bechtel über die Ziele, die Herausforderungen und die nächsten Schritte des Digital Dollar Project.

Weiterlesen.

Chinas digitale Währung: Was wir bisher über DC/EP wissen

Artikel

China ist beim mobilen Bezahlen weltweiter Vorreiter. Untersuchungen in den Metropolen Shanghai, Peking und in Hangzhou zeigen, dass sich die Marktanteile mobiler Bezahlverfahren auf bis zu 60 Prozent belaufen (Bargeld: 20 Prozent). Aufgrund der weiten Verbreitung digitaler Bezahlmethoden überrascht es kaum, dass sich auch die chinesische Zentralbank (PBoC) bereits seit 2014 mit einer eigenen digitalen Währung – einer sogenannten digitalen Zentralbankwährung (CBDC) – beschäftigt. So wurde bereits 2016 ein Forschungsinstitut „for the Development of Digital Currency/Electronic Payment (DC/EP)“ gegründet, das das CBDC-Projekt auf den Namen „DC/EP“ taufte. Zuletzt erreichte das DC/EP-Projekt einen wichtigen Meilenstein: Die Testphase.

Weiterlesen.

Eine digitale Währung gegen den Klimawandel: Die Marshall Islands machen es vor

Artikel

Digitale Zentralbankwährungen (CBDC) sind im Kommen. Mehr und mehr CBDC-Projekte erreichen nun das Teststadium. Manche sind bereits einen Schritt weiter: Neben China gehört dazu auch die pazifische Inselgruppe der Marshall Islands. Doch was grenzt dieses Projekt von anderen CBDC-Initiativen ab? Mithilfe der eigenen CBDC sollen die Folgen des Klimawandels bekämpft werden. Über das Vorhaben, die Intentionen des CBDC-Projekts und die geldpolitischen Implikationen.

Weiterlesen.